FIRST TRIP OF THE YEAR

Scarborough South Cliff

South cliff Scarborough

February, and after a bad start to the year things are beginning to improve, We are slowly recovering from the passing of Sussie 10 days ago, she has had a good life over the passed  20 years but time and age caught up and she is now at rest with Mickey who passed over in September 2010 after a good life spanning 25 years. A new start for the year begins with a weekend at Scarborough’s South Cliff and we are both looking forward to the break and change of scenery despite it being winter and miserable weather, we are also looking forward to exploring the South Cliff area, a place we haven’t spent a lot of time in unexplainable really considering the amount of time we have spent at Scarborough and in fact the rest of the East Coast of Yorkshire since the 50s.

where-they-all-gone.jpg.jpeg

Where have they all gone ?

TIME AT STANDEDGE TUNNEL

One end of this tunnel is on the Huddersfield narrow canal at Marsden West Yorkshire, and the other at the village of Diggle in Greater Manchester district and, at the other side of the South Pennines now in Lancashire.
We spent a half day here at Tunnel End Marsden with our grandsons Benjamin & Aaron on Saturday 26/09/2015 nice bright afternoon which we all thoroughly enjoyed and well worth a visit for anyone interested in canal or infact local history, where knowledge can be expanded in the old but restored warehouse, now a visitor centre which displays artefacts of the past life on the canal together with a video and narrated history of the tunnels conception to completion.

Standedge Tunnels

The Standedge Tunnels are four parallel tunnels beneath the Pennines in northern England.

The Standedge Tunnels are four parallel tunnels beneath the Pennines in northern England.

The Standedge Tunnels are four parallel tunnels beneath the Pennines in northern England. Three are railway tunnels and the other is a canal tunnel. They are located at the Standedge (pronounced Stannige) crossing point between Marsden and Diggle, across the boundary between the West Yorkshire and Greater Manchester conurbations. Before boundary changes in 1974, both ends of the tunnel were in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

The canal tunnel is on the Huddersfield Narrow Canal. It opened in 1811 and is the longest and oldest of the four and is the longest and highest canal tunnel in the United Kingdom. The first single-track railway tunnel was completed by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) in 1848 on the line between Huddersfield and Manchester and a second parallel tunnel opened in 1871. The LNWR opened a third tunnel with double tracks in 1894. All four tunnels are linked by cross-tunnels or adits at strategic intervals, which allowed the railway tunnels to be built quickly, reducing the need for construction shafts, as waste could be removed by boat.

Of the railway tunnels, only the one built in 1894 is currently used for rail traffic. Closed in 1943, the canal tunnel was re-opened in May 2001. The Standedge Tunnel Visitor Centre, at the Marsden end, is a base for boat trips into the tunnel and hosts an exhibition depicting the different crossings.

The Standedge Tunnel is the longest, deepest and highest canal tunnel in Britain. It is 5,500 yards (5,000 m) long, 636 feet (194 m) underground at its deepest point, and 643 feet (196 m) above sea level.

 The Standedge canal Tunnels entrance, The locomotive tunnels are above and parallel


The Standedge canal Tunnels entrance, The locomotive tunnels are above and parallel

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standedge_Tunnels

Standedge Tunnel Visitor Centre

The Standedge warehouse and visitor centre

The Standedge warehouse and visitor centre

 The warehouse that now houses the visitor centre

The Standedge Tunnel Visitor Centre at the Marsden end of the tunnel is located in the former warehouse used for transshipment of goods from canal barge to packhorse between 1798 when the canal reached Marsden and 1811 when the tunnel opened. The centre contains exhibitions on the history of the tunnels, the canal tunnel’s recent restoration and the Huddersfield Narrow Canal.

Tunnel End Cottages which formerly housed canal maintenance workers, houses a cafe and the booking office for 30-minute boat trips into the tunnel. The trips use electric tugs that push a passenger-carrying barge.

The visitor centre is about ½ a mile (0.8 km) west of Marsden railway station which can be reached via the towpath of the Huddersfield Narrow Canal which runs adjacent to the station. Adjacent to the railway station is the headquarters of the National Trust‘s Marsden Moor Estate which includes a public exhibition, Welcome to Marsden, that gives an overview of the area and its transport history

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standedge_Tunnels

A leisurely walk along the canal toe path will take the visitor to the village of Slaithwaite “locally called Slowit” where the canal drops via locks to a lower level and under another pack horse bridge to the village.

Huddersfield Narrow Canal and Packhorse Bridge at Slaithwaite

Huddersfield Narrow Canal and Packhorse Bridge at Slaithwaite “Slowit”

POPPY WAVE

Poppy Wave
An installation art exhibition by Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer at Yorkshire Sculpture Park.
Wave, a sweeping arch of bright red poppy heads suspended on towering stalks, by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper, rises up from YSP Lower Lake, reaching over the historic Cascade Bridge.

LANDSCAPE Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16 By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer Presented by 14-18 NOW and Yorkshire Sculpture Park Wave, a sweeping arch of bright red poppy heads suspended on towering stalks, by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper, rises up from YSP’s Lower Lake, reaching over the Park’s historic Cascade Bridge. The breath-taking sculpture – along with Weeping Window, a cascade comprising several thousand handmade ceramic poppies seen pouring from a high window to the ground below – was initially conceived as one of the key dramatic sculptural elements in the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London in the autumn of 2014. Over the course of their time at the Tower, the two sculptures were gradually surrounded by a vast field of ceramic poppies, each one planted by a volunteer in memory of the life of a British and Colonial soldier lost during the First World War. In their original setting they captured the public imagination and were visited by over five million people.

Poppies: Wave
05.09.15–10.01.16
By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer Presented by 14-18 NOW and Yorkshire Sculpture Park
Wave, a sweeping arch of bright red poppy heads suspended on towering stalks, by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper, rises up from YSP’s Lower Lake, reaching over the Park’s historic Cascade Bridge.
The breath-taking sculpture – along with Weeping Window, a cascade comprising several thousand handmade ceramic poppies seen pouring from a high window to the ground below – was initially conceived as one of the key dramatic sculptural elements in the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London in the autumn of 2014. Over the course of their time
at the Tower, the two sculptures were gradually surrounded by a vast field of ceramic poppies, each one planted by a volunteer in memory of the life of a British and Colonial soldier lost during the First World War. In their original setting they captured the public imagination and were visited by over five million people.

Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16 By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer

Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16
By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer.

Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16 By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer

Poppies: Wave 05.09.15–10.01.16
By Paul Cummins, artist, and Tom Piper, designer.

My wife and I visited Yorkshire Sculpture Park specifically to see and photograph this magnificent event, an extension of the Tower of London poppy event, We also wanted to photograph the rest of the park as it changes it’s clothes into Autumnal attire.

THE SCULPTURE PARKLAND The park is situated in the grounds of Bretton Hall, an 18th-century estate which was a family home until the mid 20th century when it became Bretton Hall College. Follies, landscape features and architectural structures from the 18th century can be seen around the park including the deer park and deer shelter (recently converted by American sculptor James Turrell into an installation), an ice house, and a camellia house. Artists working at YSP, such as Andy Goldsworthy in 2007, take their inspiration from its architectural, historical or natural environment. Since the 1990s, Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) has made use of indoor exhibition spaces, initially a Bothy Gallery (in the curved Bothy Wall) and a temporary tent-like structure called the Pavilion Gallery. After an extensive refurbishment and expansion, YSP has added an underground gallery space in the Bothy garden, and exhibition spaces at Longside (the hillside facing the original park). Its programme consists of contemporary and modern sculpture (from Rodin and Bourdelle through to living artists). British sculpture is well represented in the past exhibition programme and semi-permanent installations. Many British sculptors famous in the 1950s and 1960s, but since forgotten, have been the subject of solo exhibitions at YSP.  The redundant Grade II* listed St Bartholomew's Chapel, West Bretton built by William Wentworth in 1744 has been restored as gallery space.

THE SCULPTURE PARKLAND
The park is situated in the grounds of Bretton Hall, an 18th-century estate which was a family home until the mid 20th century when it became Bretton Hall College. Follies, landscape features and architectural structures from the 18th century can be seen around the park including the deer park and deer shelter (recently converted by American sculptor James Turrell into an installation), an ice house, and a camellia house. Artists working at YSP, such as Andy Goldsworthy in 2007, take their inspiration from its architectural, historical or natural environment.
Since the 1990s, Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) has made use of indoor exhibition spaces, initially a Bothy Gallery (in the curved Bothy Wall) and a temporary tent-like structure called the Pavilion Gallery. After an extensive refurbishment and expansion, YSP has added an underground gallery space in the Bothy garden, and exhibition spaces at Longside (the hillside facing the original park). Its programme consists of contemporary and modern sculpture (from Rodin and Bourdelle through to living artists). British sculpture is well represented in the past exhibition programme and semi-permanent installations. Many British sculptors famous in the 1950s and 1960s, but since forgotten, have been the subject of solo exhibitions at YSP.
The redundant Grade II* listed St Bartholomew’s Chapel, West Bretton built by William Wentworth in 1744 has been restored as gallery space.

TENBY, South Wales

We just got home from a great holiday in Wales, unfortunately the weather could have been better but it wasn’t too bad to keep us in, and we managed a couple of trips in the area not least to Pembroke to see its’ Castle and birthplace of Henry VII . Here is an image of St Catherine’s Island in the South bay of Tenby captured from Castle Hill, Below which is the Castle at Pembroke.

St Catherine's Island, Tenby. Taken from Castle Hill.

St Catherine’s Island, Tenby. Taken from Castle Hill.

Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, South Wales

Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, South Wales

During the reign of Elizabeth I, the Earl of Pembroke (“Jasper”, the uncle of Henry VII) was the owner of St Catherine’s Island. Later, the ownership passed to the Corporation of Tenby, which took possession of a number of crown lands. It is recorded in 1856 that a few sheep inhabited the island. An observer described them as “half wild sure footed creatures that run, turn and look, run again and leap from crag to crag almost with the agility of the Alpine Chamois”.

For many centuries a tiny church was the only building on the Island. The remains of the church were demolished when the fort was constructed in 1867. Information on the finds discovered during the demolition can be found at Tenby Museum and Art Gallery. Since the construction of the fort the island has had several owners.

TRAFALGAR SQUARE

TRAFALGAR SQUARE is owned by the Queen in Right of the Crown and managed by Greater London, while Westminster City Council owns the roads around the square, including the pedestrianised area of the North Terrace. It forms part of the North bank of the Thames business improvement district. My wife and I visited on the 17 June 2015 the first time since the 70s, what a great experiance and much the same as I remembered it, with the exception of the lack of the famous pigeons. None or very few of these ubiquitous birds were to be seen anywhere around and this was something hard for us to understand, pigeons don’t just up sticks and leave they are part of life, it goes without saying they are just there.

What looks like an

What looks like an “Alien” levitating on Trafalgar Square

Whilst contemplating this bewildering fact and watching what appeared to be levitating aliens on the terrace in front of the National Gallery the crowds of people on the square seemed to have been made aware of something strange happening, and then we saw it, a Large FALCON and its’ handler, the very reason for the lack of pigeons, this company of falcon handlers were there flying their birds to keep the pigeons away naturally and without causing unnecessary suffering, again proving the general love of animals and nature by the British people.

A bird of prey used has a deterrent to control our ubiquitous pigeons.

A bird of prey used has a deterrent to control our ubiquitous pigeons.

ANGEL-of-the-NORTH

This image is of “the Angel-of-the-North” situated at an installation art site at Gateshead, north east England, Sculptured and installed by Antony Gormley.

According to Antony Gormley, the significance of an angel was three-fold:

According to Antony Gormley, the significance of an angel was three-fold:

According to Antony Gormley, the significance of an angel was three-fold: first, to signify that beneath the site of its construction, coal miners worked for two centuries; second, to grasp the transition from an industrial to information age, and third, to serve as a focus for our evolving hopes and fears.

RACING AT SCARBOROUGH

SEASCAPE of south bay Scarborough with the harbour in the distance.

SEASCAPE of south bay Scarborough with the harbour in the distance.

Friday the 29 May 2015 I get an unexpected phone call from my youngest son, Would I like to go see the off shore power boat racing at South Bay Scarborough with him and his son Benjamin ?

Nice day forecast by the weather people, nothing much else to do, so yes, that would be a great idea so it was arranged for 9-00am on the 30ᵗʰ  😀. We arrived in busy old Scarborough at 11-30 ish and was very fortunate to secure a parking spot at the entrance to south bay just before the bridge with no parking restrictions, the day was good and warm, grabbed the camera gear and off to the Spa area of south bay, “a place where people once had to pay a toll to enter” nowadays it’s beautiful after it’s refurbishment and it’s free with all the usual facilities at hand.

A line up of the competitors jet skies lining the south beach with many more to come.

A line up of the competitors jet skies lining the south beach with many more to come.

12-30pm and the beach is filling up with people waiting to see the warm up events, “Tricks and demonstrations” by the Jet Ski riders and races, which was quite spectacular and thwart with danger making the skills of these guys more evident, quite a display they put on.

In fact I would say the Jet Ski racing and demonstrations were for me the best part of the whole event, mainly because it was done nearer the shoreline and more visible to the spectators making the events more dramatic and exciting. The power boat racing events were further out to sea and not has visible to the spectators making less of an impact than that of the jet skies.

World champion Jet Ski stunt man exhibits his skills before the main event.

World champion Jet Ski stunt man exhibits his skills before the main event.

The days events were fantastic “the first ever to be staged at Scarborough” particularly the jet ski events which were all staged close to the shore line and easy for all to see. We all three of us had a fantastic (boys) day out and managed to get some half good photos. 

Heading out to the starting line for the second Jet Ski race event.

Heading out to the starting line for the second Jet Ski race event.

THANKS FOR A GREAT DAY GUYS.